Common Excuses (...and Solutions!)

Use these solutions to the common excuses, if needed.

"I am a concerned parent, but I don't have time for all of that! I work everyday."
  • When families are involved in their children's education, they behave better, complete more homework, have better attendance rates at school, earn higher grades, score better on tests, graduate at higher rates, and have a greater enrollment in higher education.
  • If you can't volunteer on a regular basis, perhaps you can occasionally use a vacation day to chaperone a field trip or help with a special class project.
  • If you can't ever get to school during the work day, perhaps you can help with some project by working at home.
  • Perhaps you can attend an evening parent-teacher meeting.
  • We can always stay in touch by phone.
  • Perhaps your employer can host a work-site tour for students, or supply a speaker for the classroom.
  • You can help at home by checking your child's homework each day.
  • When you are home while your child is doing homework, it would be helpful if you stayed nearby to offer support.
  • Whatever you can do to show your child your support and commitment to his/her education is important.
  • What time you can find makes a difference.
  • As a parent, your child needs to see your concern, do home activities where your child is doing homework, check on homework. Your questions let your child know his/her education is important.
"School and teaching, that's your job!"
  • As a parent, you are your child's first and most important teacher.
  • We are partners in the education of your child.
  • When families are involved in their children's education, they behave better, complete more homework, have better attendance rates at school, earn higher grades, score better on tests, graduate at higher rates, and have a greater enrollment in higher education.
"My son/daughter is already working, and we need that money to make ends meet."
  • The difference in lifetime earnings between a student who did not graduate from high school and one who does is over $200,000. The difference for a student who received a bachelor's degree or more is almost $1 million. (US Census Bureau 1994)
  • If education is made a priority in your home, your child will find time.
"No one in our family is good at that subject anyhow."
  • (Subject) is important to your child's success in school and in life.
  • Your child is capable of doing better if he/she made a little more effort.
  • Your support and encouragement are essential to her/his success in any subject.
  • It could be very positive to have your child teach you what he/she is learning. That way, you'll both improve in (subject).
  • We can encourage your child to be the best he or she can be.
"He's excellent at basketball, and he'll win a scholarship. He does not need book knowledge to be a success!"
  • Many students get athletic scholarships, but they never finish college because of an injury or very tough competition.
  • A scholarship might get him to college, but an education will guarantee that he finishes.
  • The difference in lifetime earnings between a student who did not graduate from high school and one who does is over $200,000. The difference for a student who received a bachelor's degree or more is almost $1 million. (US Census Bureau 1994)
  • What will your child do if he/she is not able to go on to be a professional?