It starts with one to one conversations. . .

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It starts with one to one conversations. . .

Postby JimBoice » March 22nd, 2014, 10:25 am

“Organizers ask three questions: Who are my people? What is their urgent problem? How can they turn their resources into the power to solve their problem? They answer the questions in dialogue with their constituency by building relationships, telling stories, devising strategy, designing structure, and taking action.” ~ Marshall Ganz, 2013

Foundations of hosting one-on-one talks.

Organizing principles for one to ones:

-- Power is in the relationship.
-- People act together when they have personal connections.
-- Knowing you’re not along can build solidarity.

What is a one to one?

-- A 15 to 30 minute, face-to-face meeting.
-- A way to strengthen relationships with others in the building, organization, or community.
-- A way to understand someone’s personal concerns so we can cooperate to build the type of workplace and community we all deserve.

What does a one to one include?

-- Introduction: explain who you are and why you want to meet.
-- Connection: share something personal about yourself and about the work of building a stronger local.
-- Focus: listening, asking WHY questions, pay attention to their ideas.
-- Invitation: offer the person an opportunity to take a step in creating change.
-- Referral: who else would they suggest you speak with?

Focus of one to one conversations:

-- Personal story. Possible questions: how long have you been a teacher or ESP? Why did you chose to become one? Why do you remain in your job? what other things are you involved with? Why?
-- Concerns. Possible questions: what is your greatest need? What keeps you up at night? What makes you happy? What is the greatest need in the school? why do you think that?
-- Vision. Possible questions: what’s your vision for this union? This community?

Remember the BASICS OF LISTENING:

-- Focus on the person: make appropriate eye contact, use open body language, give people verbal and physical indications that you hear them.
-- Be patient; don’t interrupt: ask follow-up questions, ask why; let their thoughts guide the conversation.
-- Reflect back on what you heard to show you care and that you are listening. Show genuine interest and curiosity in the other person.

Things to avoid:

-- Asking questions mechanically as if taking a survey.
-- Being judgmental of what you hear.
-- Trying to “fix” the other person’s problems in the conversation.
Jim Boice
UniServ Field Representative ~ Membership & Organizational Development
New Jersey Education Association
180 West State Street
Post Office Box 1211
Trenton, NJ 08607-1211
609-599-4561 ext. 2236

http://www.facebook.com/NJEAPRIDE
JimBoice
 
Posts: 726
Joined: November 20th, 2012, 11:27 am

Re: It starts with one to one conversations. . .

Postby JimBoice » June 12th, 2014, 10:34 pm

90% of organizing is follow-up!


1. Set a goal and create a list of targets:

a. Think strategically in creating a list of targeted people to talk to about the action, meeting, or event. Split up the responsibility among a team of respected opinion leaders or activites
b. Identify places you can get people, members, and lists.


2. Personal contact:

a. Tell the person about the event.
b. Ask them to come.
c. Tell them why it is important for them specifically to be involved.
d. Get a commitment from that person.
e. Get all phone numbers (you’ll need it for a follow-up or confirmation call).


3. Written contact:

a. During or even after the personal contact follow up in writing.
b. Present the person with a flier or info sheet.
c. Make sure that the written confirmation of the meeting or event includes time, date, directions, and a way of contacting the event coordinator, if they have questions.


4. Second personal contact:

a. Make confirmation calls a day or two before the meeting/event.
b. Always stress the importance of the event and their role within it.
c. Get a further commitment to ensure their attendance; example: “Can you pick up Carlos on your way?” or “Do you need a ride since it’s your day off?”


5. Accountability/keeping track:

a. Each person responsible for turn-out needs to keep a record and be accountable for their contacts.
b. Ask people to let you know who they spoke with and what was the result: how many said yes; how many said no.


6. The 50 percent rule:

a. Always get twice as many people as your goal committed to attend your event.
b. The 50 percent rule holds true in every case except when it’s a time of crisis.
c. To be safe, always use this rule.
Jim Boice
UniServ Field Representative ~ Membership & Organizational Development
New Jersey Education Association
180 West State Street
Post Office Box 1211
Trenton, NJ 08607-1211
609-599-4561 ext. 2236

http://www.facebook.com/NJEAPRIDE
JimBoice
 
Posts: 726
Joined: November 20th, 2012, 11:27 am


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