NJEA history. . .

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NJEA history. . .

Postby JimBoice » April 11th, 2014, 2:14 pm

Jim Boice
UniServ Field Representative ~ Membership & Organizational Development
New Jersey Education Association
180 West State Street
Post Office Box 1211
Trenton, NJ 08607-1211
609-599-4561 ext. 2236

http://www.facebook.com/NJEAPRIDE
JimBoice
 
Posts: 744
Joined: November 20th, 2012, 11:27 am

Re: NJEA history. . .

Postby JimBoice » June 17th, 2014, 10:37 am

NJEA's 150th anniversary celebration:

Article: http://www.njea.org/news/2004-01-10/nj-senate-honors-njea-s-150th-anniversary

Video episode of Classroom Close-Up: http://bcove.me/dmo3428d

Special September 2003 issue of the NJEA Review: https://www.njea.org/njea-media/pdf/150th_ReviewSpecialIssue.pdf?1403019850703
Jim Boice
UniServ Field Representative ~ Membership & Organizational Development
New Jersey Education Association
180 West State Street
Post Office Box 1211
Trenton, NJ 08607-1211
609-599-4561 ext. 2236

http://www.facebook.com/NJEAPRIDE
JimBoice
 
Posts: 744
Joined: November 20th, 2012, 11:27 am

Re: NJEA history. . .

Postby JimBoice » June 17th, 2014, 10:37 am

Jim Boice
UniServ Field Representative ~ Membership & Organizational Development
New Jersey Education Association
180 West State Street
Post Office Box 1211
Trenton, NJ 08607-1211
609-599-4561 ext. 2236

http://www.facebook.com/NJEAPRIDE
JimBoice
 
Posts: 744
Joined: November 20th, 2012, 11:27 am

Re: NJEA history. . .

Postby JimBoice » June 17th, 2014, 5:06 pm

The attached timeline is from NJEA's 150th anniversary curriculum project. :mrgreen:
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Jim Boice
UniServ Field Representative ~ Membership & Organizational Development
New Jersey Education Association
180 West State Street
Post Office Box 1211
Trenton, NJ 08607-1211
609-599-4561 ext. 2236

http://www.facebook.com/NJEAPRIDE
JimBoice
 
Posts: 744
Joined: November 20th, 2012, 11:27 am

Re: NJEA history. . .

Postby JimBoice » June 30th, 2014, 9:26 pm

Jim Boice
UniServ Field Representative ~ Membership & Organizational Development
New Jersey Education Association
180 West State Street
Post Office Box 1211
Trenton, NJ 08607-1211
609-599-4561 ext. 2236

http://www.facebook.com/NJEAPRIDE
JimBoice
 
Posts: 744
Joined: November 20th, 2012, 11:27 am

Re: NJEA history. . .

Postby JimBoice » August 18th, 2014, 6:33 am

Collective Bargaining

Jail statistics public school employee strikes

Between 1967 and 2001, 850 public school employees were jailed for striking.

Local year of strike No. of people days served Notes

Woodbridge AFT 1967 2 30-90
Passaic City 1970 6 30-90
Newark AFT 1970 186 10-90
Jersey City 1970 20 10-30
Fair Lawn 1971 14 30
Newark AFT 1971 16 (unsure)
Freehold Regional 1972 11 30-45
Elmwood Park 1973 4 30
Long Branch 1974 12 2
Elizabeth 1975 4 2
Matawan 1977 35 2
106* 7 *community service
Willingboro 1977 10* 7 *community service
Brookdale Comm. College
Non-Academic Staff 1978 6 4
Camden 1978 17 up to 22
Plainfield 1978 8 7
Paterson 1979 15 2
Teaneck 1982 150 3
Middletown 2001 228 1-4

Total school employees jailed: 850 served between 5 – 10 years in jail.

Longest jail time: According to NJEA records, Nicholas D’Agostino spent the most time in jail – 90 days as a result of the Passaic Strike 1970.

Strike Statistics

Total number of strikes: 254 -- between 1946 - 2003 (18 were AFT or no affiliate - some strikes were NJEA/AFT combined)

First Strike Threat: 1919 -- The first known teacher strike threat in New Jersey occurred in Palmyra. No records exists that it was ever carried out.

First strike: 1946 -- Paterson NJEA/AFT – strike lasted 1 day
(Note: Most of the teachers in Paterson reported sick on the same day in February 1946. The same thing occurred in Hawthorne one year later.)

First multi-day strike: 1953 – Garfield (NJEA). The strike lasted 3 days.
The first fine: 1966 -- Newark (AFT) ($2700)

The first jailing: 1967 -- Woodbridge AFT 2 jailed (1 AFT rep for 2 months, and one teacher for 30 days.)

The first NJEA jailing: 1971 –- Jersey City (NJEA)
Tom Favia, Lou Scialli (deceased) and 20 other members of the JCEA went to jail on Nov. 22, 1971 for a strike that occurred in February 1970. They spent Thanksgiving in jail and were released on Dec. 21, 1971 just before Christmas.

Longest strike: 55 days -- Newark (AFT) 1971
25 days -- Hoboken (NJEA) 1975

Biggest Fine: $500,000 (1/2 million dollars) -- Hamilton (NJEA) Sept. 2000

Most jailed: 228 -- Middletown (NJEA) in 2001

Typical Length of strike: 1 day -- (83 of the 254 strikes)

Contract Imposition –this needs to be filled in based on latest developments in the legislature. Find out how many times school boards have imposed a contract. As of 2000 Manville strike, it was the 15th time in NJ history that it happened.

Strike History by Decade

Decade Number of Strikes

1940-49 2
1950-59 9
1960-69 30
1970-79 115
1980-89 77
1990-99 14
2000-03 7
TOTAL 254

1962 - the NEA devised a procedure it called “sanctions.” The term covered any collective act by employees against the employer except a strike: work slowdowns and billboards critical of a school board. NJEA also experimented with “extreme sanctions.” instead of taking a strike vote, the local would condemn their district as an “unfit” place to teach, notifying NJEA and NEA of their action. The State and national associations would announce the condemnation, notifying members, college education departments, and teacher-placement agencies. It was considered unethical for a member to accept a teaching job in a sanctioned district.

1963 - NJEA’s first negotiations bill was introduced in the Legislature. Thus began the push to win negotiations and grievance rights for New Jersey’s public employees. After intensive lobbying by NJEA and other groups, the Legislature overrode the vote on Sept. 13, 1968, and, for the first time in New Jersey history, public employees had legislated bargaining rights. Called the Public Employment Relations Act, the new law required the employer to negotiate in good faith with the organization that represented the majority of its employees; used the broad definition of negotiable .The Act established the Public Employment Relations Commission (PERC) to administer the law’s provisions.

1967 - Extreme Sanctions Union Beach school board voted not to rehire the president of the Union Beach Teachers Association and two other untenured teachers active in UBTA. 31 of the district’s 47 teachers tendered resignations effective two weeks before the end of the school year. Hundreds marched through the town to protest the school board’s firings. NJEA reported the action in the Association newspaper and sent notices to in surrounding districts; the presidents and placement directors of all teacher colleges in the surrounding states.
The New Jersey’s Supreme Court declared sanctions unconstitutional in the Weintraub decision. As a result of the New Jersey experience, the use of sanctions dwindled nationally and, by the 1970s, sanctions were in use no more.

1967 - NJEA conducted a Teacher Rights Rally in October of 1967 in Asbury Park’s Convention Hall and a second in May of 1970 in an armory in Elizabeth. The purpose was to demonstrate against sentences imposed on teachers who had violated court injunctions.

1968 - The Weintraub decision (which declared sanctions unconstitutional) angered many teachers and triggered the Teacher Rights Movement. In 1968, NJEA established a Teacher Rights Fund to aid school employees involved in strikes. This fund guaranteed that money would be raised to pay all legal fees, fines, and salary lost by school employees jailed because of a strike. The Fund also provided interest free loans to strikers.

1972 - NJEA conducted a year-long “Fair Play for Teachers” campaign in support of two specific legislative bills. One would grant teachers the limited right to strike. The other would strengthen PERC and give it the power to redress unfair labor practices. The campaign included a Fair Play rally at Asbury Park

1973 - after NJEA Vice President-elect (and Teacher’s Rights Committee chairperson) Paul Dimitriadis died while apparently recovering from open heart surgery, the fund was renamed the Dimitriadis Teacher Rights Fund.

1983 - Created a in interest free loan designed to help members in crisis district. Local must be in crisis 11 days to qualify for loan.

Statewide Rallies

1932 – Early in 1932, local pressure for reduced salaries resulted in a legislative move to relax the Tenure Act prohibition against salary cuts. This was met by a “march on Trenton” in which thousands of teachers poured into the State capital when the Legislature was considering this proposal. The proposal was defeated for the time being, only to reappear the following year.

1934 - Efforts to defeat the “salary reduction” amendment to the Tenure Act were unsuccessful. The Association did defeat, with another “March on Trenton,” a 1934 attempt to make a flat 25% cut in all local expenditures, including schools. Some 4,000 teachers and parents filled Trenton’s War Memorial Building on that issue.

1967 - Teacher Rights Rally in Asbury Park’s Convention Hall. The purpose was to demonstrate against sentences imposed on teachers who had violated court injunctions.

1970 - Teacher Rights Rally in an armory in Elizabeth. The purpose was to demonstrate against sentences imposed on teachers who had violated court injunctions.

1972 - Fair Play Rally Asbury Park in support of two legislative bills. One grant teachers limited right to strike, other strengthen PERC and give powers to redress unfair labor practices. Attended by 5,000.

1983 – Rally for Justice (585 Rally) – chanting “Justice Now”. The City of Trenton was the setting for a massive show of strength by 12,000 NJEA members who jammed behind the State House on Oct. 23 to call for the restoration of public school employee bargaining rights and funds for public education. It centered on passage of Assembly bill 585 and Senate bill S-1235 to restore bargaining rights denied by the 1978 Ridgefield Park decision and the cost-of-living pension adjustment for retired members. If failed in Senate when six legislators broke their promise and voted against it.

1989 - Rally at War Memorial Auditorium April 6 Cuts Hurt Kids Coalition. 3,000 public employees chanting “Give it Up Chuck” Chuck Hardwick was the Assembly speaker who refused to support the restoration of state funds.

1994 – UPROAR Rally. NJEA’s four major areas of concern were salary cuts, pension fund cuts, health care benefit cuts, and education program cuts. Over 30,000 members braved the rains to protest the budget cuts.

2003 – Uproar for Fairness Rally. The proposed cuts could threaten schools, pensions, higher education. The Fairness Alliance made up of 119 organizations created a plan to raise almost $1 billion in additional state revenue by marginally increasing income tax rates for the highest-income 2% residents making over $250,000… It is called the millionaire tax.
Jim Boice
UniServ Field Representative ~ Membership & Organizational Development
New Jersey Education Association
180 West State Street
Post Office Box 1211
Trenton, NJ 08607-1211
609-599-4561 ext. 2236

http://www.facebook.com/NJEAPRIDE
JimBoice
 
Posts: 744
Joined: November 20th, 2012, 11:27 am

Re: NJEA history. . .

Postby JimBoice » August 18th, 2014, 6:36 am

Generic History

1853 2003
Population less than ½ million 8.4 million
School children 100,000 1.34 million
Teachers 1,500 126,521

1765 – The first public school in New Jersey was Brainerd School in Mount Holly, and it is the oldest school building in New Jersey. It was the first building in which public education as we know it was offered.

1853 - At the initial meeting of the Association, Dr. Hoagland was designated "State Agent" of the new Association to advance the cause of Teacher Institutes.
The question which most concerned the founders of the Association was the improvement of teaching. Teaching was just beginning to emerge as a profession. Licensing had only recently been introduced. The salaries of women teachers were lower than those of men. Many school districts made ends meet by hiring male teachers for the winter sessions, and women in the summer when the men would presumably be hard at work.

Terms: Common schools – what we call public and private schools now
Institutes – teacher training in late 1800s ran by county associations
Normal Schools – State funded colleges for teachers

1855 The Legislature established the State Normal School, with an appropriation of $10,000 for its support.

CIVIL WAR YEARS (1840s to mid 60s) Teachers shortage - The drafting of young men to war created, as it has done since, a teacher shortage, especially acute because the proportion of men teachers was so high.

1896 – The first teacher Pension law in the nation was passed, thanks to the efforts of Elizabeth Allen.

1909 - First Tenure Law in New Jersey. It safeguarded competent teachers from nepotism, political removal and capricious dismissal.

1920 - a world war had ended only a few years before. Automobiles, airplanes, movies, and radio, Inflation shrunk the purchasing power of teachers and created hundreds of local crises. There was an acute shortage of qualified teachers.

1919 - First Statewide Pension law requiring state contributions and mandatory participation.

1940s - during teacher shortage, emergency certificates were issued to teachers with far less than the qualifications desired. The Association, through the Long-Time Planning Committee, sought to maintain standards, to call the situation to the attention of the public, and to encourage, through a “Future Teacher” program, young people to enter the profession. As its first century ended, the Association played a leading role in obtaining a $15,000,000 bond issue for expansion of the State Teachers Colleges.

Summary

Early in this century, with no paid staff, the Association was able to secure the tenure rights and pension benefits that today's teachers still enjoy.

1930s - with a professional staff of one person, the Association fended off a Legislature willing to carve up pupil education because of the vicissitudes of the Great Depression.

1940s, 1950s, and 1960s - NJEA secured laws granting a wide variety of fringe benefits to teachers, establishing the county colleges, and, for the first time in the State's history, granting negotiating rights to public employees. Working coalitions with other organizations interested in quality education, NJEA also secured passage of bond issues that built the County Colleges and expanded the State Colleges and University into a multi-purpose system of public higher education.

1970s - a unified profession continued to improve public education through legislation at the Federal and State levels. Responding to demands from a membership that now had the right and responsibility to improve the terms and conditions of employment in their own districts, NJEA enlarged its professional staff so that local affiliates would have the help needed to secure gains at the local level.
Jim Boice
UniServ Field Representative ~ Membership & Organizational Development
New Jersey Education Association
180 West State Street
Post Office Box 1211
Trenton, NJ 08607-1211
609-599-4561 ext. 2236

http://www.facebook.com/NJEAPRIDE
JimBoice
 
Posts: 744
Joined: November 20th, 2012, 11:27 am

Re: NJEA history. . .

Postby JimBoice » October 15th, 2014, 4:36 pm

Jailings, pressure tactics prevail:
Camden board refused to negotiate

From the November 1, 1978 issue of the NJEA Reporter:

The scene is a familiar one.

The school board, unwilling to negotiate, uses the courts to try to pressure its school employees into settling for an inadequate contract. It uses court injunctions to get employees jailed.

The result: children lose, the community loses and board-employee relations vanish into thin air.

In Camden City, the board has acted out the script. Seventeen members of the Camden Education Association were jailed Oct. 17 after the board drew in the courts with injunctions and contempt citations.

Compounding the dispute was the intervention of city officials in a series of strange maneuvers starting Oct. 23.

City officials intervened to release from jail individuals or small groups of leaders, even though the judge had originally permitted only the mediator to secure release of all bargaining team members for negotiations.

The separate meetings were designed to split the bargaining team and pressure the individuals into a settlement, charged CEA President Paul Gayowski. As a result purported separate memorandums of contract agreements were initiated for instructional assistants, secretaries and clerks.

The tactic cut off effective bargaining, Gayowski said.

CEA immediately filed an unfair labor practice charge with the Public Employment Relations Commission. It maintained that all four bargaining units involved in the dispute could only be represented by the full CEA negotiating team, as designated by past board resolutions.

NJEA members were urged to contact Camden school board members to ask them to stop harassing individuals and to start negotiating. NJEA President Frank Totten called the actions an "outrage."

At press time, the walkout was dragging in its third week.

Members of the CEA walked off the job on Oct. 6 when year-long contract talks failed to bring about a settlement. Four bargaining units covering more than 1,800 teachers, secretaries and clerks, instructional assistants and law enforcement and attendance officers are involved in the crisis.

The board, trying to use an iron fist to settle the differences, immediately went to court to obtain an injunction. As in the case of the Brookdale support staff crisis in Monmouth County (see story p. 3), the Camden board sought and obtained a civil order which precluded bail provisions and apparently any commutation of sentences by the Governor.

CEA members voted to withhold their services until a contract was ratified.

"I am tremendously impressed with the strength and solidarity of the CEA members in the face of continued harassment by the board of education," stated CEA President Paul Gayowski.

Although schools have been kept open, few students are attending. In the classrooms, only attendance is taken, then a half-hour to a few hours later students are dismissed.

Originally 21 individuals were cited for a contempt-of-court hearing before Superior Court Judge Peter Devine. CEA attorney Joel Selikoff succeeded in having four members removed from the citations. The remaining individuals included CEA officers and a large percentage of the negotiating team.

The 17 members were sentenced to jail Oct. 12 by Devine, who also imposed a $5,000 fine on the CEA for each day the work stoppage continues. Devine directed that each day's fine be paid by noon the following business day.

Although the 17 were scheduled to go to jail Monday, Oct. 16, the N.J. Supreme Court stayed the sentence until an appeal could be considered.

The Appellate Division of Superior Court and the N.J. Supreme Court turned down appeals Oct. 13 and Oct. 16, forcing the members to go to jail Oct. 17.

The CEA leaders are being held in Camden County jail on Camden City Hall's sixth floor in an area separate form other prisoners. CEA negotiators are being permitted to leave jail for negotiating session set up by James Mastriani, a mediator from the Public Employment Relations Commission.

A move by board attorney Malachi Kenney to have negotiations sessions set by the judge in the school board's City Hall offices failed.

CEA members remain on the picket lines. NJEA members from all over the state have offered their support.

Follow up articles:

-- December 1, 1978 -- page 4/5: "Call renewed for ending staff jailings" and "Contracts draw Camden action to close."
-- January 2, 1979 -- page 3: "Food donations pour into Camden." First paragraph: "NJEA members have overwhelmingly responded to pleas of assistance for members of the Camden Education Association who were severely affected by a four-week crisis this fall."
-- February 1979 -- page 6: "Camden retains inst. assistants."
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Jim Boice
UniServ Field Representative ~ Membership & Organizational Development
New Jersey Education Association
180 West State Street
Post Office Box 1211
Trenton, NJ 08607-1211
609-599-4561 ext. 2236

http://www.facebook.com/NJEAPRIDE
JimBoice
 
Posts: 744
Joined: November 20th, 2012, 11:27 am

Re: NJEA history. . .

Postby JimBoice » November 25th, 2014, 5:23 pm

Willingboro members carry out park cleanup.
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Jim Boice
UniServ Field Representative ~ Membership & Organizational Development
New Jersey Education Association
180 West State Street
Post Office Box 1211
Trenton, NJ 08607-1211
609-599-4561 ext. 2236

http://www.facebook.com/NJEAPRIDE
JimBoice
 
Posts: 744
Joined: November 20th, 2012, 11:27 am


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