Project Citizen

The New Jersey Social Studies Supervisors Association (NJSSSA), the New Jersey Center for Civic Education and the New Jersey Council for the Social Studies (NJCSS) are sponsoring a free, one-day workshop about Project Citizen at Rutgers University in Piscataway on March 27 from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.

Project Citizen is a process-based program that actively engages students in identifying, researching, and trying to implement solutions to public policy problems, often focusing on an issue in their local community. Developed by the Center for Civic Education, Project Citizen offers students the opportunity to apply the skills of active citizenship in the real world and promotes competent and responsible participation in public policy-making. Students choose the problem they work on and are invested in the successful completion of their project.

Teachers and students who have participated in this evidence-based program consistently rate it as one of the most engaging they have experienced. Research has shown the effectiveness and enduring impact of Project Citizen. A report by the RMC Research Corporation found statistically significant greater gains among participants than comparison students in their knowledge of public policy. Students participating in Project Citizen also demonstrated superior writing ability in articulating, researching, and advocating policy solutions in essays addressing public policy problems. Students of skilled teachers had greater increases in both knowledge and skills.

Teachers will receive five professional development hours. To register, send an email with your name, email address, school, district and grade to Robert O’Dell at robert.odell@rutgers.edu. You will receive a confirmation that you are registered.

Educating Today’s Students to Sustain Tomorrow’s Democracy

The New Jersey Social Studies Supervisors Association (NJSSSA), the New Jersey Center for Civic Education and the New Jersey Council for the Social Studies (NJCSS) are sponsoring a free, one-day workshop, “Educating Today’s Students to Sustain Tomorrow’s Democracy” at Rutgers University in Piscataway on April 11, from 8:30 a.m. – 2:30 p.m.

A primary reason for the establishment of public schools was to develop an informed, engaged citizenry that could sustain our democracy.  It is important that we help our students understand how American representative democracy evolved, how it functions, and to appreciate the importance of being an informed, engaged citizen who makes reasoned decisions in elections and holds elected officials accountable for their actions.

Workshop topics will include logical standards for discussion and debate, teaching politics and elections through American ideals, multiple perspectives in the classroom, activities to develop listening skills, and how to evaluate candidates and the veracity of news and social media.

Participating teachers will receive five professional development hours. To register send an email indicating your name, email address, school, district and grade to Robert O’Dell at robert.odell@rutgers.edu. You will receive a confirmation that you are registered.

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